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Do’s and Don’t’s for Caring for Your Baby’s Skin

 

There’s nothing sweeter than soft newborn baby skin, so you’ll want to keep it that way as long as possible. But newborn skin is especially sensitive, so it’s important to know the do’s and don’ts of baby skin care.

Don’t bathe your baby every day. Too much tub time can dry out baby’s skin, but more importantly, babies don’t get dirty enough to need daily baths, at least until they are crawling and eating solids. Until then, just bathe your baby a couple of times a week using mild soap and baby shampoo. In between baths, you can do daily spot checks with a warm, wet washcloth. When bathing baby, focus on cleaning the mouth, the skin folds and the diaper region. Wash from the top down and save the diaper area for last to avoid spreading bacteria from that area.

Do change your baby’s diaper frequently. Change diapers frequently, wiping gently but thoroughly each time with baby wipes made for sensitive skin. Dab diaper cream on baby’s bottom. Wait a few moments to air-dry so moisture doesn’t lead to a painful diaper rash.

Don’t use products with fragrance. It’s best to use skincare products made especially for babies, such as fragrance-free and tear-free shampoos, bath gels and lotions. With each one you use, monitor your baby’s reaction in case they are allergic. Avoid perfumed, antibacterial and deodorant soaps, as they are too harsh for sensitive baby skin.

Do keep baby’s skin moisturized. Ointments, which have a thicker consistency, are best for keeping your little one’s skin soft. Baby powders are not necessary.

Don’t put new clothing on your baby without washing first. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) also recommends washing new clothing and towels before using them on your baby. It is not necessary to use special “baby” detergents, regular detergent is fine.Skin conditions are often genetic, so if you have sensitive skin, chances are your baby might too. If your child develops irritation or a rash on body parts that her clothes come in contact with, your detergent could be to blame. Try switching to a milder baby detergent or one that is “free and clear” of allergens, dyes and fragrances.

Do protect baby’s skin from the sun. Babies should be kept out of direct sunlight until they are six months old, according to the AAP. If you’ll be outdoors with your baby, dress her in protective clothing including a hat, long sleeves, pants and socks – keep clothing lightweight so shedoesn’t get too hot. If there is no shade around, either from the stroller, umbrella, tree or canopy, consider usinga sunscreen on your baby’s skin. The use of sunscreen in infants younger than 6 months is an often-debated topic. Although the American Academy of Pediatrics states that using sunscreen on infants younger than 6 months of age is safe, you should always check with your pediatrician before using sunscreen on babies under 6 months old.

Written by Cristi Driver

 

August 03, 2015 by Blue Lizard Staff

Protecting Little Faces: Using Sunscreen on Infants and Children

Slathering on the sunscreen for lazy days at the pool or beach are warm-weather rituals for many families. But if you're tempted to let your child play outdoors for even a few minutes without the proper sun protection, you’re taking an unhealthy risk. According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, sustaining five or more sunburns in youth increases lifetime melanoma risk by 80 percent. A baby’s skin is especially delicate and burns more easily. Their sensitive skin contains less melanin, the pigment that gives our hair and eyes their color and offers some sun protection.

Follow these simple tips all year round to help protect you child from the sun’s harmful rays.

Infants Under 6 Months

  • The use of sunscreen in infants younger than 6 months is an often-debated topic. Although the American Academy of Pediatrics states that using sunscreen on infants younger than 6 months of age is safe, you should always check with your pediatrician before using sunscreen on babies under 6 months old.
  • Seek shade whenever possible under a tree, umbrella or stroller canopy. Dress your baby in long sleeves and pants in a light fabric and always use a hat.

 Children Older than 6 Months

  • Sunscreen can be applied to all areas of the body, but be especially careful when applying sunscreen to a child’s face as you don’t want to get it in their eyes and cause stinging.
  • Sunscreen can be applied to all areas of the body, but be especially careful when applying sunscreen to a child’s face as you don’t want to get it in their eyes and cause stinging.
  • Make sure to use a broad-spectrum sunscreen, as it will screen out both ultraviolet A (UVA) and B (UVB) rays.
  • Use a sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 15 (up to SPF 50).
  • Make sure to use enough sunscreen to cover all exposed areas, especially the face, nose, ears, feet and hands. Rub it in well.
  • Older children should learn to apply sunscreen themselves, and make it a routine habit.
  • Sunscreen needs time to absorb into the skin, so apply sunscreen at least 15 to 30 minutes before going outdoors.
  • Anytime your child goes outdoors they need to wear sunscreen, not just when they are at the beach or the pool. Make it a habit to apply sunscreen before your child goes to school in the morning so they are covered during recess.
  • Reapply sunscreen every two hours and after swimming, sweating or drying off with a towel.

Keep in mind that sunscreen should be used for sun protection, not as a reason to stay in the sun longer. Adults should also model what we want our children to do and wear sunscreen as well.  You’ll not only set a good example, but you’ll reduce your risk of skin cancer, sun damage and skin aging.

Written by Amanda Reichert

 

July 28, 2015 by Blue Lizard Staff

Blue Lizard® Protects Walkers at Dallas Promise Walk for Preeclampsia™

On Saturday, May 9, dedicated volunteers will gather for a fundraising event to help mothers and babies. These volunteers are committed to fighting preeclampsia and will walk together to raise funds and awareness of this dangerous condition that can affect the health of unborn babies and mothers. Blue Lizard Australian Sunscreen® will be there too, protecting walkers’ skin from the harsh rays of the Dallas, Texas sun.

Thousands of women and babies die or get very sick each year from a dangerous condition called preeclampsia, a life-threatening disorder that occurs only during pregnancy and the postpartum period. Preeclampsia and related disorders, such as HELLP syndrome and eclampsia, are most often characterized by a rapid rise in blood pressure that can lead to seizure, stroke, multiple organ failure and death of the mother and/or baby. The Promise Walk for Preeclampsia™, held in 45 locations nationwide, supports the mission of the Preeclampsia Foundation as they provide patient support and education, raise public awareness, catalyze research and improve healthcare practices for millions of mothers and their babies every year who are impacted by preeclampsia and other related hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.

For several years, Blue Lizard Australian Sunscreen has been part of this effort, donating sunscreen products to Promise Walks throughout the U.S. This is our first year participating in the Dallas event and look forward to being part of their efforts.

“Blue Lizard has been a great supporter of the work our volunteers are doing in their communities,” said Laney Poye, director of community relations for the Preeclampsia Foundation. Between 250-300 people are expected to walk in Dallas. That’s a lot of valuable skin to protect, but Blue Lizard is up to the job.

Remember, you need protection from UV rays whenever you’re outdoors, not just when you’re at the pool or the beach, and not only when the sun is shining – you can get UV damage even on cloudy days. Blue Lizard Australian Sunscreen is a broad-spectrum sunscreen, protecting skin from both UVA and UVB rays, so the Dallas Promise Walk participants can enjoy the outdoors while supporting an important cause.

For more information on preeclampsia, the Preeclampsia Foundation and the Promise Walk for Preeclampsia visit www.preeclampsia.org.

Written by Jo Northup

May 07, 2015 by Blue Lizard Staff
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